How to Run Chkdsk Windows 10 before Boot from Command Prompt

Chkdsk is a built-in tool in Windows that can scan and fix errors on your hard drive. It can also check the integrity and health of your file system and recover bad sectors. Running chkdsk can help you prevent data loss and improve your PC’s performance. However, sometimes you may need to run chkdsk before Windows boots up, for example, when your PC is not starting properly, when you suspect a disk corruption, or when you want to perform a thorough disk check. In this case, you can use the command prompt to run chkdsk on startup.

How to Run chkdsk Windows 10

Steps to Run Chkdsk Windows 10 Before Boot from Command Prompt

In this article, we will show you how to run chkdsk Windows 10 before boot from command prompt in four easy steps. We will also explain the meaning of the different parameters and options you can use with chkdsk.

Step 1: Open Command Prompt as Administrator

To run chkdsk on startup, you need to open an elevated command prompt, which means you have to run it as an administrator. To do this, follow these steps:

  1. Press Windows + R to open the Run dialog box.
  2. Type cmd and press Ctrl + Shift + Enter to launch command prompt as administrator.
  3. Click Yes if prompted by User Account Control.

Step 2: Enter the Chkdsk Command

Once you have opened the command prompt, you need to enter the chkdsk command with the appropriate parameters and options. The basic syntax of the command is:

chkdsk [volume:] [/f] [/r] [/x].

Here is what each part of the command means:

[volume:]This specifies the drive letter of the disk you want to check, such as C:, D:, or E:. If you omit this part, chkdsk will check the current drive by default.
[/f]This option tells chkdsk to fix any errors it finds on the disk. If you don’t use this option, chkdsk will only scan the disk and report any errors, but not fix them.
[/r]This option tells chkdsk to locate and recover any bad sectors on the disk. Bad sectors are physical areas on the disk that are damaged or unreadable. Recovering bad sectors means moving any readable data from those sectors to another location on the disk. This option also implies /f, so you don’t need to use both /f and /r together.
[/x]This option tells chkdsk to force the volume to dismount before checking it. This means that any open files or programs on that volume will be closed and inaccessible while chkdsk is running. This option also implies /f, so you don’t need to use both /f and /x together.

For example, if you want to check and fix errors on your C: drive, and also recover any bad sectors, you can enter this command:

chkdsk C: /r

Step 3: Schedule Chkdsk on Startup

After you enter the chkdsk command, you may see a message like this:

Chkdsk cannot run because the volume is in use by another process. Would you like to schedule this volume to be checked the next time the system restarts? (Y/N)

This means that chkdsk cannot access the disk because it is being used by Windows or other programs. In this case, you need to schedule chkdsk to run on startup, when Windows is not loaded yet.

To do this, simply type Y and press Enter. You will see a message like this:

This volume will be checked the next time the system restarts.

Step 4: Restart Your PC

The final step is to restart your PC and let chkdsk run on startup. To do this, follow these steps:

  1. Close any open programs or files on your PC.
  2. Click Start and select Power.
  3. Click Restart.
  4. Your PC will reboot and start checking your disk before loading Windows. You will see a message like this:
    Checking file system on C: The type of the file system is NTFS. One of your disks needs to be checked for consistency. You may cancel the disk check, but it is strongly recommended that you continue. Windows will now check the disk.
  5. Depending on the size and condition of your disk, chkdsk may take several minutes or hours to complete. You can press any key to cancel the disk check, but we don’t recommend doing that unless necessary.
  6. When chkdsk finishes checking your disk, it will display a summary of its results, such as how many files and folders it processed, how many errors it fixed, how many bad sectors it recovered, etc.

Your PC will then continue loading Windows normally.

How to Run chkdsk Windows XP before Boot

This section will show you how to run CHKDSK Windows XP before boot in four easy steps. We will also explain the meaning of the different parameters and options you can use with CHKDSK.

  1. Insert your Windows XP installation CD into your CD-ROM drive and restart your PC.
  2. When you see the message “Press any key to boot from CD”, press any key to start the setup process.
  3. When you see the “Welcome to Setup” screen, press R to enter the recovery console.
  4. Select the Windows XP installation that you want to check and type the administrator password if prompted.
  5. Enter the CHKDSK command with the appropriate parameters and options. The basic syntax of the command is:
    CHKDSK [volume:] [/f] [/r]
    Here is what each part of the command means:
    [volume:]This specifies the drive letter of the disk you want to check, such as C:, D:, or E:. If you omit this part, CHKDSK will check the current drive by default.
    [/f]This option tells CHKDSK to fix any errors it finds on the disk. If you don’t use this option, CHKDSK will only scan the disk and report any errors, but not fix them.
    [/r]This option tells CHKDSK to locate and recover any bad sectors on the disk. Bad sectors are physical areas on the disk that are damaged or unreadable. Recovering bad sectors means moving any readable data from those sectors to another location on the disk.
    For example, if you want to check and fix errors on your C: drive, and also recover any bad sectors, you can enter this command:
    CHKDSK C: /r
  6. Press Enter and wait for CHKDSK to complete its operation. Depending on the size and condition of your disk, CHKDSK may take several minutes or hours to finish. You will see a summary of its results, such as how many files and folders it processed, how many errors it fixed, how many bad sectors it recovered, etc.
  7. Type exit and press Enter to exit the recovery console and restart your PC.

Conclusion

Running CHKDSK from command prompt is a simple and effective way to check and repair errors on your hard drive. It can also help you recover data from bad sectors and improve your PC’s performance. We hope this article has helped you learn how to run CHKDSK from command prompt in Windows 10.